U.S. Marines storm Mogadishu, Somalia

December 10, 2019

This day in History: 1992 - 1,800 United States Marines arrive in Mogadishu, Somalia, to spearhead a multinational force aimed at restoring order in the conflict-ridden country.

 

Following centuries of colonial rule by countries including Portugal, Britain and Italy, Mogadishu became the capital of an independent Somalia in 1960. Less than 10 years later, a military group led by Major General Muhammad Siad Barre seized power and declared Somalia a socialist state. A drought in the mid-1970s combined with an unsuccessful rebellion by ethnic Somalis in a neighboring province of Ethiopia to deprive many of food and shelter. By 1981, close to 2 million of the country’s inhabitants were homeless. Though a peace accord was signed with Ethiopia in 1988, fighting increased between rival clans within Somalia, and in January 1991 Barre was forced to flee the capital. Over the next 23 months, Somalia’s civil war killed some 50,000 people; another 300,000 died of starvation as United Nations peacekeeping forces struggled in vain to restore order and provide relief amid the chaos of war.

 

In early December 1992, outgoing U.S. President George H.W. Bush sent the contingent of Marines to Mogadishu as part of a mission dubbed Operation Restore Hope. Backed by the U.S. troops, international aid workers were soon able to restore food distribution and other humanitarian aid operations. Sporadic violence continued, including the murder of 24 U.N. soldiers from Pakistan in 1993. As a result, the U.N. authorized the arrest of General Mohammed Farah Aidid, leader of one of the rebel clans. On October 3, 1993, during an attempt to make the arrest, rebels shot down two of the U.S. Army’s Black Hawk helicopters and killed 18 American soldiers.

 

As horrified TV viewers watched images of the bloodshed—including footage of Aidid’s supporters dragging the body of one dead soldier through the streets of Mogadishu, cheering—President Bill Clinton immediately gave the order for all American soldiers to withdraw from Somalia by March 31, 1994. Other Western nations followed suit. When the last U.N. peacekeepers left in 1995, ending a mission that had cost more than $2 billion, Mogadishu still lacked a functioning government. A ceasefire accord signed in Kenya in 2002 failed to put a stop to the violence, though a new parliament was convened in 2004.

 

 

At Mancaves RV & Boat Storage, we offer quality storage at affordable prices. We provide a clean and secure Self-Storage Facility combined with exceptional customer service that will make your storage experience at Mancaves as easy as possible. Over the years, we have continued to work with some fantastic customers which has allowed us to continually expand our facilities to better serve our surrounding community storage needs. 

Call Us Today!  713.295.0222

Please reload

Our Recent Posts

This day in History: 1780 - During the American Revolution, American General Benedict Arnold meets with British Major John Andre to discuss handing ov...

Benedict Arnold commits treason

September 21, 2020

This day in History: 1814 - Francis Scott Key pens a poem which is later set to music and in 1931 becomes America’s national anthem, “The Star-Spangle...

Francis Scott Key pens “The Star-Spangled Banner”

September 14, 2020

This day in History: 1974 - In a controversial executive action, President Gerald Ford pardons his disgraced predecessor Richard M. Nixon for any crim...

Ford pardons Nixon

September 8, 2020

1/1
Please reload

Tags

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

 

©2018 by Mancaves, LLC.

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now